5 Common Misconceptions About Toughened Glass

People often shy away from glass as a decorative material because they don’t understand it. We believe that glass is an elegant, reliable and versatile material and so we wrote this mythbusting article in order to clear up some common misconceptions about glass.

It is dangerous

People often assume that glass is a dangerous material to make furniture out of, particularly around children. A lot of people have horrific images of children bumping into a glass table, smashing it and sustaining some horrible injury. Whilst this fantasy may become a reality when dealing with standard glass, Toughened glass is different. When toughened glass breaks it forms small blunted granules as opposed to sharp dangerous shards making it relatively harmless.

 

It is difficult to clean

A lot of people think glass is quite difficult to keep clean and to maintain because fingerprints are frequently left and its transparency tends to highlight messes. The truth is that glass is arguably much easier to look after than traditional materials. Whilst it is true that glass is more prone to fingerprints and visible messes, these things are considerable easier to wipe off of a glass top, and unlike wood, glass doesn’t stain.

 

It is weak

People often look at glass as being quite weak and fragile and needing constant vigilance and care, however this isn’t necessarily true. Whilst it is still advised to look after your glass product it is no more necessary than looking after any other product. Glass can be used to hold Surprisingly large amounts of weight, like for instance this Futureglass GEM HiFi stand which can hold weights over 20kg. They don’t call it toughened for no reason.

 

It is clear

A popular misconception about glass is that it is a clear colour and perfectly transparent however this is in fact not the case. Toughened glass actually has a slight green tint to it because of the process through which it is manufactured. There are types of toughened glass that go through a different manufacturing process in order to remove the green tint, this glass is called ‘low iron glass’.